Springs in dictionary

Springs as defined in reference books.

Webster’s Encyclopedic Dictionary

Spring: an elastic body or device that recovers its original shape when released after being distorted.

Encyclopaedia Britannica

In technology, elastic machine component able to deflect under load in a prescribed manner and to recover its initial shape when unloaded. The combination of force and displacement in a deflected spring is energy, which may be stored when moving loads are being arrested or when the spring is wound up for use as a power source. Although most springs are mechanical, hydraulic and air springs are also obtainable.

The helical spring, in which wire is wrapped in a coil that resembles a screw thread, is probably the most commonly used mechanical spring. It can be designed to carry, pull, or push loads. Twisted helical (torsion) springs are used in engine starters and hinges. Helical tension and compression springs have numerous uses, notably automobile suspension systems, gun-recoil mechanisms, and closing valves on engines.

The leaf spring is used mainly for vehicle suspension and in one form consists of a stack of slightly curved narrow plates of equal width and varying length clamped together, with the shorter plates in the centre to form a semielliptical shape. The ends of the longest plate are attached to the vehicle by pin connections, and the vehicle axle is clamped to the centre, at which point the stack is thickest.

The spiral spring is made from flat strip or wire coiled up in the manner of the groove on a phonograph record. As a mainspring or hairspring, it provides a compact source of energy in clocks and watches; it is also used on typewriters and parking meters.

The torsion-bar spring shown in the figure is used in the suspension systems of some automobiles. The circular torsion bar is fixed in plate B and supported but free to rotate in plate A. A load applied at point C on the lever twists the bar, and the stiffness of the suspension, which depends on the length and diameter of the bar and the length of the lever, can be easily varied by changing L.

An air spring is basically a column of air confined within a rubber-and-fabric container shaped like a bellows. The spring action results from the compression and expansion of the air. When used on road vehicles, air springs can keep the vehicle at a constant standing height regardless of load.

Hydraulic springs are comparatively small, thick-walled cylinders in which the spring effect is produced by applying a load to the fluid in the cylinder through a small piston entering at the centre of one end of the cylinder. The piston movement, or deflection, is produced by the compression of the fluid and the deformation (bulging) of the cylinder walls. These springs are particularly useful in applications requiring high load capacities and stiffnesses.